If you build teardrops look here...

General Discussion about almost anything Teardrop or camping related

If you build teardrops look here...

Postby goteardropgo » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:17 pm

Hi All, this is my first post. I've been stalking the forum for some time now, getting lots of good ideas for my build. I have a few questions about my build approach and looking for some suggestions/feedback.

The back story
Always wanted a teardrop trailer and now looks like I'm on my way. A friend of mine works at a shop that manufactures pressure washer trailers. Occasionally they have customers turn in trailers for upgrades. In this case, a customer turned in a unit so beat up they decided to just scrape it. They sold the unit to me for $200 just so they could get it out of their shop. Turns out the trailer itself is in pretty good shape. So we stripped it down, salvaged what we could and a bada bing bada boom I have a trailer frame.

The trailer I started with was narrow and I wanted at least a double sized bed. So I've added to the frame to widen it and we welded on fenders (old fenders were a bit beat up). The trailer frame is now 5 x 9 with a portion of the fender as part of the platform (axle is 5 feet wide).

Now there are a few problems with my frame. 1. Not all the frame portions are level. they aren't bad but I'm not sure I can just slap on the plywood platform and move on. To try and get the platform nice and level I plan to put 1x3 wood strips on top the frame and sand them until I can get the frame level. these strips will be attached to the plywood platform.

Question:
1. Is there an adhesive people like to use in addition to bolts to glue the platform to the frame?
2. How close does this have to be? Will I notice slumps of flaws?
Attachments
Trailer Frame.jpg
Trailer Frame
Trailer Frame.jpg (103.96 KiB) Viewed 1294 times
goteardropgo
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:23 am

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby twisted lines » Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:37 pm

Welcome to Amazon Anonymous

1 . Loctite PL3x

2 . Looks good from my house.
5.5 X 10 Flatback Benroy in a pile,
And it's growing!
User avatar
twisted lines
Teardrop Master
 
Posts: 256
Images: 2
Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2018 4:37 am
Location: Jefferson

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby edgeau » Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:38 pm

Temp variations will make the frame change at different rate to wood so don't try to glue, just bolt. If the variation is small just use some extra washers to pack up the low spots

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
User avatar
edgeau
The 300 Club
 
Posts: 344
Images: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2016 8:21 am
Location: Gold Coast Australia
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby goteardropgo » Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:44 pm

Amazon anonymous? afraid I don't follow.

Washers....hummmm...that's a good idea.
goteardropgo
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:23 am
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby tony.latham » Wed Jan 15, 2020 5:43 pm

Amazon anonymous?


Unless you live across the pond, UPS will be dropping stuff off from Amazon several times a week. And thus you should join AA.

Is there an adhesive people like to use in addition to bolts to glue the platform to the frame?


I can't recall anyone gluing and bolting their cabin down. I used six 3/8" bolts and if I recall correctly, that gives me somewhere north of 20,000 pounds of shear strength. I'm not telling you to not do it, but it's not normally done and I've never heard of a cabin come off the chassis.

T
User avatar
tony.latham
Gold Donating Member
 
Posts: 4249
Images: 17
Joined: Mon Jul 08, 2013 4:03 pm
Location: Middle of Idaho on the edge of nowhere
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby halfdome, Danny » Wed Jan 15, 2020 5:57 pm

Wow, 20,000 #.
I use about 24 bolts on my cabin to chassis , wonder what that equates to ?
:D Danny
ImageImage
"Conditions are never just right. People who delay action until all factors are favorable do nothing". William Feather
Don't accept "It's Good Enough" build to the best of your abilities.
Image
Teardroppers Of Oregon & WashingtonImage
User avatar
halfdome, Danny
*Happy Camper
 
Posts: 5570
Images: 185
Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2005 11:02 pm
Location: Washington , Pew-al-up
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby twisted lines » Wed Jan 15, 2020 6:51 pm

tony.latham wrote:I can't recall anyone gluing and bolting their cabin down.
T


I did :embarassed:
5.5 X 10 Flatback Benroy in a pile,
And it's growing!
User avatar
twisted lines
Teardrop Master
 
Posts: 256
Images: 2
Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2018 4:37 am
Location: Jefferson
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby tony.latham » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:53 pm

Wow, 20,000 #.
I use about 24 bolts on my cabin to chassis , wonder what that equates to ?


Well, mine is actually 29,418 pounds. If those were 3/8" Grade 2, your shear strength is 117,672 pounds. :shock:

Tim, aka Noseoil mentioned this a while back:

https://nucor-fastener.com/Files/PDFs/TechDataSheets/TDS_013_Shear_Strength.pdf

I did


And it's still there. :thumbsup:

:beer:

Tony
User avatar
tony.latham
Gold Donating Member
 
Posts: 4249
Images: 17
Joined: Mon Jul 08, 2013 4:03 pm
Location: Middle of Idaho on the edge of nowhere
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby working on it » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:26 pm

tony.latham wrote:Well, mine is actually 29,418 pounds. If those were 3/8" Grade 2, your shear strength is 117,672 pounds.


* Like the OP's trailer, my TTT started out as a salvaged, small, derelict trailer. I couldn't give it away. So, I started building, but with visions of strength and durability over-riding common sense, and normal building practices. My wife was to use this trailer solo camping, I thought, so I wanted it to be a tank.

* No one wants their trailer to come apart on the highway, on bad roads, nor during a violent thunderstorm. It seems that some of us (myself, intentionally) may have gone overboard trying to secure our home-built cabin structures to the trailer frame, which had already been massively transformed. My original frame was small and broken, so the corrective build-up and over-build-up started on day one. After the initial <200 lb frame had received another 150 lbs of steel and larger wheels, then the floor became the next addition.

* Eight x 3/8" carriage bolts (in the cross-members), plus thirty-eight # 10 Tek screws (around the perimeter of the 4 8 frame)...all thru 11 gauge steel, probably has a pull-through value of 68924 lbs. Then, if I factor in the 48 feet of 3/8" beaded PL adhesive between the plywood and frame, the bond strength added is around 113184 lbs (at 524 psi when fully cured...subject to substrate failure of the Birch plywood-to-steel interface) = 181478 lbs of force needed to remove my decking. Certainly strong enough, even for my over-built "tank" of a trailer.
carriage and teks.png
carriage and teks.png (337.88 KiB) Viewed 1170 times


* With that much strength as a base to build on, I followed up in the same manner with 10 more tubes of adhesive, hundreds of 1/4" carriage bolts + fender washers + ny-locks, and dozens of steel corner and gusseted angle brackets to attach the 3/4" thick walls and roof to that floor (not to mention the additional interior framing added later. Similarly, I beefed up the already strengthened frame a year after it was first used, and put in an all-new HD axle and suspension parts.

* My trailer now weighs 11x its' original weight (and has cost probably 11x what I paid for it 30+ years ago =$50), when travel-ready. It seems that it is never to be completed, as I modify it after every trip. That's probably the part of this experience that I like the most. Even if the starting point is not what you'd like, it's the struggle to overcome the imperfections that is what I value most highly.
trailer progress in stages.jpg
trailer progress in stages.jpg (250.66 KiB) Viewed 1170 times
2013 HHRv "squareback/squaredrop", rugged, 4x8 TTT, 2220 lbs
  • *3500 lb Dexter EZ-Lube braked axle, 3000 lb.springs, active-progressive bumpstop suspension
  • *27 x 8.5-14LT AT tires (x 3) *Weight Distribution system for single-beam tongue
  • *100% LED's & GFCI outlets, 3x fans, AM/FM/CD/Aux. *A/C & heat, Optima AGM, inverter & charger(s)
  • *extended-run, on-board, 2500w generator *Coleman dual-fuel stove & lantern, Ikea grill, vintage skillet
  • *zinc/stainless front & side racks *98"L x 6" diameter rod & reel carrier tube on roof
156215157958148599
User avatar
working on it
1000 Club
1000 Club
 
Posts: 1967
Images: 455
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2011 9:05 pm
Location: DFW Texas
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby Sparksalot » Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:46 pm

I used 13 bolts for the cabin to the frame. I don't recall the reason now, but i've had good luck since 2008.
Done? Surely you jest. A teardrop is never "done".

The Compass Rose build thread: viewtopic.php?t=23213

Inspiration: http://tnttt.com/Design_Library/Trailer%20for%20Two.htm

It's got a cop motor, a 5.3 LS plant, it's got cop tires, cop suspensions, cop shocks. ~ Elwood Blues
User avatar
Sparksalot
Silver Donating Member
 
Posts: 1373
Images: 579
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2008 9:36 pm
Location: Texas by God (TX, Buda, TX)
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby goteardropgo » Thu Jan 16, 2020 5:57 pm

Thanks all for your replies.

1. Get the frame set up, wired and painted. Check
2. Make the platform. I'm going to use 1x3 wood strips and washers to achieve a nice level platform. Then I'll attach plywood to the 1x3 strips, glue/staple them together (wood to wood). Then take the whole platform and bolt it to the frame with some screws (anywhere between 4 to 13 screws). Last, I'll stable/glue on a nice finished 1/4 inch ash ply (give it a nice look). Platform and floor done.
3. Prop up some walls. Probably go with = aluminium skin, 1/4 or thinner ply, 3/4 ply (skeletonized), form in the openings/gaps, 1/4 or thinner inside ply for a nice interior finish.
4. work out any add on's (Cabinets, wiring...)
5. Roof and so on.

How'm I tracking?

My worries:
1. I don't know a thing about electrical except that it shocks me when I touch it.
2. I don't know how wide my walls need to be for the doors and windows I want to install (guess I'll guess I'll get a 1 1/4 deep door window?). No matter really cause I doubt I'll cut the openings for them without leaving at least a nice 1/4 gap to allow wind, rain and bugs to come through.
3. I'm scared to death this thing is gonna look like one of those cardboard box homeless shelter things you see under the freeway over pass (maybe worse) cause I can't cut a straight line to save my life.

I'm worried all the other kids are gonna look at my project and laugh.
goteardropgo
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:23 am
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby tony.latham » Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:23 pm

I don't know a thing about electrical except that it shocks me when I touch it.


I'm a 12V guy so electrical is an easy deal. We've never missed 120 volts while camping. (We're camping.)

I run a 12 AWG two-wire cable from the battery to the fuse block. That wire is fused at the battery with a 15 amp fuse.

Image

That's a Blue Seas fuse block with a negative bus bar. The black wire on the right is the negative from the battery. The fat red wire is the positive from the battery.

From the fuse block, each appliance (fan, lights, USB etc.) gets its own 14 AWG two-wire cable (red/black).

Image

Simple. :beer:

Tony
User avatar
tony.latham
Gold Donating Member
 
Posts: 4249
Images: 17
Joined: Mon Jul 08, 2013 4:03 pm
Location: Middle of Idaho on the edge of nowhere
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby goteardropgo » Thu Jan 16, 2020 7:34 pm

Thank you Tony.

Ok, first, what's 12 volt? What's ac/dc (besides an awesome rock band)? Whats an invertor (is it like a flux capacitor)?

Here's what I wanna do...

I would like to have an air conditioning unit (powered only when connected to shore power), a shore power outlet outside the trailer so I can "hook up" to power (so I can run more appliances when parked next to a house or something), outlets inside dedicated for shore power and outlets inside dedicated for battery power use. I'd like enough battery power available for some small LED lights inside, to run a small coffee maker or a toaster and to charge phones through usb ports. Also use battery to run some external lights (door light and some floods - knowing the LED floods can only be on for a short period of time before really taxing the battery life). I'd like a power gauge inside so I can tell when the batteries will die.
A dream would be the ability to install a solar panel and charge the batteries in this fashion and charge the batteries via shore power (charge up both ways). I am not interested in charging via the car (I have not wired the trailer to do this and prefer not to).

I don't plan to build a galley because I doubt I'll ever use it the way it's intended (and I can focus on complicating my build in other ways).

Are my POWER plans possible?
goteardropgo
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2019 4:23 am
Top

Re: If you build teardrops look here...

Postby edgeau » Fri Jan 17, 2020 5:02 am

It is all possible, but there is a lot to get your head around if you are starting from zero. Have a read of the electrical secrets part of the forum. Here is a quick primer. AC is Alternating Current, (shore power) 110v in the US, 240v here in Australia, either one will kill you so respect it. DC is direct current, most run 12v the same as a car. This has positive and negative as the electric current only runs one way. By convention red wires are positive and black negative but the electricity doesn't care what colour the wire is so always check. An inverter is a device that you feed 12v DC and get out 110v or 240v AC. This lets you run household appliances from a battery. (For a short while ) From what you describe you don't want an inverter anyway. You do need a decent charge controller that will take AC shore or solar DC to charge the battery. There are whole threads on calculating the power draw of all your gadgets and sizing the appropriate battery.

Did I mention shore power can kill you? Here in Australia it is actually illegal to DIY that bit, we have to have a licensed electrician do it. I believe there is no such requirement in the US but find someone knowledgeable to help or stick with 12v DC.

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
User avatar
edgeau
The 300 Club
 
Posts: 344
Images: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2016 8:21 am
Location: Gold Coast Australia
Top

AC/DC

Postby noseoil » Fri Jan 17, 2020 8:56 am

It's simple enough to do both with a teardrop. My wife required an air conditioner for camping (we were living in Tucson & it gets pretty hot there), so I had to do the 12v & 110v system. We have a shore power outlet for hookups at a camp ground (and a small Yamaha 2000 watt generator for the boonies).

PD4045 (look up Progressive Dynamics online) is a panel which uses the battery & a shore power connection for the distribution. It also has an converter, so the battery will charge if necessary when it's hooked up. Not rocket science, but it requires a bit of thought. Just make sure to test each circuit as you go to stay out of trouble. Take a look at my build log to see what I did (good luck finding it, but it's there somewhere...)

160190
Build log: viewtopic.php?f=50&t=60248
The time you spend planning is more important than the time you spend building.........

137905
User avatar
noseoil
1000 Club
1000 Club
 
Posts: 1493
Images: 511
Joined: Sun Apr 27, 2014 8:46 am
Location: Raton, New Mexico, living the good life!
Top

Next

Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 3 guests